Islandia patch.

Just a little patch this time.

Basically, this new patch just adds another small restriction.

Here’s how it works: You may take in a max of twenty resources per turn for every port you own. Yes, they may be different resources. So you can give all the resources you want. All this does is limit you to taking in a max of twenty resources (Again, just for in the span of one turn.) for every port you own.

Example: If you own 3 ports, that means you may take in up to 60 recourses in one turn.  And remember, they can be different resources.

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Islandia patch.

Islandia update.

This update is just adding a small restriction. Basically, for every house you own, you get to push up your resource capacity by 50.

So if you have four houses, that is 200 resource capacity.

Okay, let me clear that up. If, for example, you had four houses, that means you may have two hundred of EVERY resource. Not just all of them added together.

So for three houses, that would be 150 stone, 150 wood, and 150 food. Max.

Gold doesn’t count.

Okay, I’m sorry, I am tired right now.

I hope it’s clear enough.

Bye.

Islandia update.

Islandia update.

Just a small, yet huge, update this time. When playing Islandia, you now have the option to play Islandia: Frontiers mode. Basically, this just means there are no disasters, so you can go on building your Island uninterrupted.

This update is probably only fun to use if you have a board, (See earlier board update.) so that you can actually see what you’ve created. Anyway, I’m off to go try it out myself, so yeah. Happy, erm, Islandiaing!

Eh heh.

Islandia update.

Islandia Empires release.

Finally! I got Islandia Empires released! Took me a while, I suppose. Anyway, below you’ll find all the information you’ll need to play it. It’s not extremely fun, though you should be able to enjoy it a bit, but the next game I’m going to be working on should be rather enjoyable. (Because, for once, I will have made a game without a graph paper board.) Anyway, here’s all the stuff you’ll need to know.

(Apparently, some of the stuff I had in strong, or had in a bigger font, was messed up. Sorry about that.)

Introduction.

Hey guys! I decided that before I give the rules out, I should just give a short explanation and my plans for Islandia Empires. (Or IE, for short.). First off, let me just explain its plot, which, by the way, is very, very small. I’ll probably work out some kind of backstory in the future.

Basically, the point of the game is to destroy all the enemy castles, through whatever means necessary. Those means will consist of bribing, treachery, (More or less.) team work, and most of all, warfare. Sounds good, right?

As for my plans for it, well, I’m not entirely sure. For now, I’ll just try to slowly update it and add more stuff. I don’t know, maybe I’ll turn it into something else entirely, someday. Who knows? Anyway, I have two or three other games that I want to start work on soon, so I probably won’t be doing very many updates for a while. Right then, below you’ll find all the rules and everything else, so you can go read that now. Hey! Why are you still reading this paragraph? Vamoose!

Turn phases.

First off, each player takes their turn separately, in order. You probably already know that, though.

Phase 1. Spell casting.

Phase 2. Moving.

Phase 3. Fighting/collecting/building/making new units. (Any order you want. Also, if I do building, and then fighting, I can still do more building. I just can’t do any more once phase 3 is over. That works for everything else you can do during phase 3, too.)

Phase 4. Before we go on, let me just say one thing. You can discuss treaties (More on these below.) and what you want to trade with other people at any time you feel like. Phase 4 is just the only time that you can actually buy and sell stuff with people. As for treaties, while you can discuss those at any time you want, this is just a good time to do it. (In my opinion.)

Now, about trading.

It is at this time that you can trade resources and spells with other players. Whatever arrangement you make is your choice. Everyone can trade with each other no matter whose turn it is. You don’t need a building to do it, either. (For now, anyway.) Oh, one other thing. You may also trade buildings and units. To do that, just change the faction symbol on the unit/building. (Note: When the Human faction wants to trade a crossbowman, it is downgraded to an archer once another player takes control of it. Humans may not trade horseman.)

Also, you can work out treaties with other players during this time. Treaties can consist of any agreement you want, just make sure you don’t actually break the rules or anything. For example, you can’t just spawn in a building wherever you want, and call it a ‘treaty’. As long as you aren’t doing that, though, you can make any treaty you want with another player. Be warned, though. It’s not against the rules to not follow through on a treaty, so the biggest consequence a player could get from not completing their end of the agreement is that the other players wouldn’t trust them as much anymore.

Moving, fighting, and battle-points.

Here’s how a turn works for individual units:

Moving: This happens during turn phase 2. You may move up to three squares. Not diagonal. You may not walk into or through units, and you may not walk into or through buildings. When moving, simply erase the unit and redraw it wherever you are moving it to.

Fighting: Turn phase 3.

To fight, you will need to be adjacent to an enemy unit. You may then attack, doing the damage that your respective unit does.

Battle-points: Each unit will have a certain amount of battle-points. When an attack hits them, they have to take away however many battle-points the respective attack does. If the unit runs out of battle-points, then they die. (When this happens, erase the unit on the board, and also its corresponding stats, which should be on another piece of paper. More on stats below.)

Fighting mechanics are the same for buildings, in that they take the same amount of damage as units do. However, they cannot fight back or move, so you will need to defend them.

Building/battle points for buildings.

Workers may start construction on buildings during turn phase 3.

Castles take 100 stone to build. To build one, you will need a worker to be adjacent to the area in which it’s getting built, and you will need to draw it in at this time. (More on this below.) and it takes 5 turns to make one. (So every time a player enters turn phase 3 after this, the castle gets 1 turn closer to being finished.) Castles take up 3×3 squares. You may not build one on top of another building or unit. You may build them on top of resources and healing flowers, but the resources/healing flowers are automatically destroyed. You need to write how long till the castle is finished in place of the battle points amount. If the castle is attacked while it is being built, it is immediately destroyed. When the castle is finished being built, erase the square that has the turns till finished amount, and put the battle-points in place of it.

100 Battle-points.

Copy and paste is used below, so don’t get confused or anything.

Barracks take 80 wood to build. To build one, you will need a worker to be adjacent to the area in which you want to build one, and it takes 3 turns to make one. (So every time a player enters turn phase 3 after this, the barracks gets 1 turn closer to being finished.) Barracks take 2×3 space, either way. You may not build one on top of another building or unit. You may build them on top of resources and healing flowers, but the resources/healing flowers are automatically destroyed. You need to write how long till the barracks is finished in place of the battle points amount. If the barracks is attacked while it is being built, it is immediately destroyed. When the barracks is finished being built, erase the square that has the turns till finished amount, and put the battle-points in place of it. (I talk about this below, but just a reminder: One of the squares must show the symbol of the Empire that owns it.)

70 Battle-points.

Note: You may only have two barracks for every castle.

When it comes to drawing in a building, simply draw the squares that the building covers completely in with pencil. However, remember to have one of the squares show your teams faction symbol on it, so as to distinguish it from other peoples buildings. Also remember to have one of the squares show the buildings battle-points.

Collecting resources.

Different resources will be scattered throughout the map. To collect them, you will need to move a worker unit adjacent or on top of them. Workers move like fighter units, but instead of attacking, they get a collection/building ability during turn phase 3.

For collecting: Once on top of or adjacent to a resource, they can collect from it. Collecting will gain you ten of that resource. Resources are infinite, and will not run out. However, you may have only 1 worker collecting from a recourse at a time.

Making units.

For now, there are only 3 unit types (Minus the horseman. He’s Human only, though, and talked about below.) : The fighter, the worker, and the archer.

To build the fighter: Spend 50 gold, then choose a space adjacent to a barracks to place him.

To build the worker: Spend 30 gold, then choose a space adjacent to a barracks to place him.

To build the archer: Spend 70 gold, then choose a space adjacent to a barracks to place him.

(Note: You may not spawn any of those into a unit or building.)

Recognizing resources.

First off, when you’re making resources, you’ll need to remember to put letters in the squares that the resources reside in so that you can recognize them.

Here are the letters you can use to represent the different resources.

For gold, write a g.

For wood, write a w

For stone, write an s.

Now, as you’ll probably end up having to draw a unit AND a resource symbol on one square, try to make the letters that represents the resources small, and draw them in a corner if possible, so as not to confuse the symbols with the unit numbers.

Faction symbols.

The main point of faction symbols is just to recognize your units and buildings on the battlefield from others peoples.

They don’t need to be fancy or anything, they just need to be a shape that you can recognize.

Using them is rather simple, in fact. All you need to do is draw your faction symbol on the same squares that hold your units, so that you can recognize them.

As for buildings, just draw the faction symbols on whichever square you prefer.

Important unit explanation.

So, I’ve explained how units move, and I explain how much health each one gets below, but I need to go over a few more things.

So, first off, when you make a unit, draw a unique number on it. As you make more and more units, you’ll have to give them larger and larger numbers, so as to distinguish them.

Now on another sheet of paper, you’ll need to keep a list of the units you own. You can do this however you want, but you’ll need to make sure that you keep track of the units battle-points, symbol, faction symbol, (I explain faction symbols below.) and an empty space to write in when you need to write that a spell is in effect. Also, you’ll need to make sure that you put the unique number of the unit wherever you are drawing all its stats.

Example: (Sorry I made the letters too small again. I appear to be cursed.)

It doesn’t have to look quite as neat as this, but it should be as easy to read as this, so as to keep gameplay going.

Also, you’ll need to put your unit’s faction symbols on the same squares as their numbers, so as to distinguish them from other peoples units.

Advanced unit explanation.

The worker.

Recommended unit symbol: Hammer or pick.

Cost: 30 gold

Spawn at: Barracks

Building/gathering explanation: I explain above.

Health: 15 Battle-points

Squares per turn: 3

The fighter.

Recommended unit symbol: sword.

Cost: 50 gold

Spawn at: Barracks.

Fighting explanation: You can do 5 damage. To do it, move to a square adjacent to the enemy you want to hit, and use your attack.

Health: 20 Battle-points.

Squares per turn: 3

The Archer.

The archer’s unit symbol is a bow. (I’d recommend a bow, but you can choose whatever you like.)

Now here’s how they work.

Cost: 70 gold.

Spawn them at: Barracks.

Fighting explanation: You can shoot enemies up to three squares away. Yes diagonally, but only up to two diagonal in a single shot. Here are all your options, when it comes to shooting at max range. (You can still shoot enemies who are closer to you than this.) : 3 adjacent, 2 adjacent and 1 diagonal, or 2 diagonal and one adjacent.

Attacks deal 5 damage.

Health: 15 battle-points.

Squares per turn: 3

The Horseman. (Human only.)

Cost: 80 gold.

Battle-points: 25

Damage: The frontal square must be adjacent to an enemy to attack. 5 damage.

Squares per turn: 4.

Advanced explanation:

Horsemen are two squares long, but still one square wide

When moving them forwards, as said above, they can go 4 squares. They can move sideways while still facing forward, but only 1 square, so you will want to turn them so that they are facing wherever you want to go if you are planning on going a fairly long distance. To do that, you will have to use one of your movement squares. Here’s how to do it. (Sorry the text is so small. You’ll have to zoom in.)

If you want to move backwards without turning around, that’s fine, but your movement is reduced to 1, like when moving sideways.

How spells work

Here, I’ll just be explaining how spells work, their costs, and anything else you’ll need to know

First off, spells will have a card with their name, cost, and picture on it. The card can just be a small piece of paper with the things I put above on it. When making the card, just remember to put the name and cost on it. (The shop will display that stuff too.) The picture is optional. (For the picture, you can just draw something that corresponds with what the spell does. So, for instance, a speed spell could show a dude running really, really fast. Anyway, spells are below.)

Spell of speed

All your units gain an extra movement square for the next three turns.

Shop cost: 100 gold. (Remember to put it in the spell in effect category while it’s going on.)

Spell of strength

All your units gain an extra 5 attack damage for the next two turns.

Shop cost: 130 gold. (Remember to put it in the spell in effect category while it’s going on.)

Spell of lightning

Choose any square with an enemy unit on it, and use the spell. Does 10 damage. (Does not work on buildings.)

Shop cost: 80 gold.

Meteorite spell

Choose any square on the map, and use the spell. All squares adjacent and diagonal to it take 10 damage.

Shop cost: 150 gold.

Nausea spell

Choose any three enemy units, and use the spell. For two more turns, the units you chose now cannot attack, and may only move on square, even if a speed spell is active. Also, if they’re Orcs, they cannot give a damage multiplier bonus to their teammates.

If this spell is active on one or more of your units, remember to put it in the spells in effect category for your affected units.

Shop cost: 130 gold.

What to do with spells when you’ve finished using them.

Frankly, you can do whatever you want with them, seeing as it doesn’t really affect gameplay. I would recommend, though, that you recycle used spells throughout the rest of the game, and maybe even keep them for the next game/games.

Keeping track of resources, spells, spells in effect, and other.

So basically, when playing, you should have a sheet of paper that has your current amount of resources on it, and also the spells that are in effect. (Like speed spells, strength spells, etc.) You can also keep your current amount of troops on it, along with how many buildings you own, but those are optional. As for keeping track of the spells that you own, just keep the spell cards you own near you, and make sure that they don’t get confused with other people’s stuff.

The shop.

Here’s how it works. Write down all the spells you’ll be playing with (I would think all of them, but if you only want a few, you can do that too.) on a blank page, and display their costs. Write down the descriptions, or simply read what I’ve put up here. (I would recommend you put the word ‘Shop’ at the top of the blank sheet so that it doesn’t get confused with other sheets.)

The different factions/player limit.

There are four factions: Elves, Halflings, Humans, and Orcs. This does make it so that you may only have up to four players. Feel free to come up with your own factions, though.

Racial bonuses.

Human tech bonus.

Horsemen.

Cost: 80 gold.

Battle-points: 25

Damage: The frontal square must be adjacent to an enemy to attack. 5 damage.

Squares per turn: 4.

Advance explanation:

Horsemen are two squares long, but still one square wide

When moving them forwards, as said above, they can go 3 squares. They can move sideways while still facing forward, but only 1 square, so you will want to turn them all the way to the side. To do that, you will have to use one of your movement squares. Here’s how to do that. (Sorry the text is so small. You’ll have to zoom in.)

If you want to move backwards without turning all the way around, that’s fine, but your movement is reduced to 1, like when moving sideways.

Crossbowman.

(Basically, this unit replaces Archer. You can use the same symbol.)

Cost: 70 gold.

Battle-points: 20

Damage: Roll two dice. Above 9: Does 10 damage. Below 9: does 5.

Orc damage multiplier bonus.

Damage multiplier.

When battling an enemy, all friendly units within three squares range (Yes, diagonally) of the combatant/combatants give a plus 3 attack damage when the combatant or combatants attack the enemy soldier. Also, the combatants can give bonuses to each other.

Elf speed bonus.

Speed bonus.

Elves can move four squares instead of three. (Speed spells make it so that they move five.)

Halfling dodge bonus.

Absorption bonus.

When you get hit, roll the dice. If you get a 9 or above, then you take no damage. However, a Halfling unit can only try to dodge the first attack, so if he gets attacked again on the same turn, even if he wasn’t able to dodge the first attack, then he does take damage. Also, you can’t dodge spells. However, getting hit by a spell does not count as a normal attack, so you can still try to dodge the first attack thrown at you by an enemy unit.

Winning/losing.

Winning: Destroy all the other players’ castles!

Losing: All your castles are destroyed. Bummer.

Starting out.

Here, I’ll just be explaining what to put on the map, and where you might want to put it. (Also making the map in the first place.) Anyway, before you start playing, you’ll have to build your map. To do that, take however many pieces of graph player you want to play with, and tape them together from the bottom. If you’re playing with just one piece, then that’s fine, though it’s a little small, even just for two players, (I know from experience.) and way too small for 3+ players.                                                                    Right, after you’ve gotten the paper, you’ll have to draw the resources and healing flowers in. I’ve found it kind of fun to put a few resources next to all the players, just enough to sustain their needs, and to put a TON of them in the middle, so that there will be lots of warfare there. (Once again, I know this will happen from experience.) Also, I would recommend that you put healing flowers in the middle, so if you want to heal a unit you will have to weigh in some risk. Just remember, though, the map you’ll enjoy the most is the one that you find the easiest, but also the most fun.

Also, when starting, you will have to decide where you want to put your buildings down, you will have to decide where to put your units down, and you will have to decide what resources you want to start with. Add this in with multiple people who have different ideas on how the map should be, and it can cause setup to take quite a while.

Islandia Empires release.

Islandia update.

Just a little thing this time. Basically, when you are playing with a board, instead of using graph paper, you can use normal paper instead. To do that, you can just draw more realistic looking buildings from the side. I suppose, though, that you could also draw them from the top. The side just seems a little easier.

(Note: I am getting EXTREMELY close to finishing the rules for my new game. I should be finished in just a few days, in fact.)

Islandia update.

Update on how stuff is going.

First off, I have a little Islandia update. Basically, if you would rather not wait the whole ten turns for more population, then you can just get new population every five turns instead. That’s pretty much it, frankly.

The main thing I wanted to talk about is that I am working on getting Islandia Empires out there. I’m playing a test game with my Dad and Sister at the moment, and though it’s been taking us a few days to get it finished, it’s been a success. When we’ve finished the game, I plan to fix up and polish the rules a bit, then post it on here. After that, I’ll be working on a zombie board game and a cowboy board game, (Both use graph paper boards.) and then I want to start working on a construction board game. All are going to have names that correspond with Islandia. It’ll be like this: Islandia zombie apocalypse, Islandia the wild west, and Islandia construction tycoon.(I have a theme going, as you can tell.)

Anyway, I just wanted to tell you guys that I’m still working on this kind of stuff, and that I just haven’t been able to post a lot lately.

Anyway, that wraps it up for the most part, so thanks for reading, guys.

Update on how stuff is going.

Islandia patch.

So, I’ve kind of been running out of ideas for Islandia lately, but I had one.

I

am

giving

Islandia

a

a

board.

Basically, it’s simple. I’m obsessed with graph paper, and Islandia is one of the few games I’ve made that doesn’t have a graph paper board, and now, I’m changing that. So, right now, I’m working on making three new games, (These are going to be big, compared to the other ones I’ve made, as they’ve been weird in the past, and are hard to play, and are boring, and make no sense. Anyway, they’ll be kind of cool. Hopefully, anyway.) and the first one is turning out to be kind of interesting, really. (I haven’t started work on the other two yet.) Right, I got a little off track. Anyway, I had a thought. Why not give Islandia a board? It won’t have any effect on gameplay, and will be optional, but it should make Islandia a little more fun. Anyway, below, I’ll explain how it works.

Before you start, you’ll need a sheet of graph paper. After that’s done, the rest will be easy.

Simply draw buildings onto the graph paper when you build them. A house could take up a 2×2 square space, and a mill or mine could take up a 2×3 space. I’m not going to give you rules on how big to make stuff, because that’s entirely up to you. As for ports, I can just recommend that you make a row at one end of the map blue, for water, and show a port build next to it. Anyway, entirely up to you. Oh, and try experimenting with colors if you’d like, I think that would be cool. And remember, this is all optional

By they way, I’ve been working on the first of three games that I’ll be making, and it’s pretty cool, at least for a nerd like me. I told you about it a little in my last post, I think, but I figure I should tell you a little more about it, since I can’t put it up yet. I’ve actually added a lot of cool stuff by now, like spells, and archers, and trebuchets, and a shop, and racial bonuses. But yeah, it’s cool.

The problem with it is that you have to draw and erase the characters to move them across the map, and that can get on your nerves after a while. In fact, my sister ended up forfeiting because it was so boring. (Though it was a little chaotic, as it was the first game, and I kept redoing the rules, there was no building stuff, combat was boring, there were only two of us, ect.) I was about to beat her when she quit, too

So, there you go, an Islandia update adding a board.

So as Tryhardninja (Youtuber) says…

AND I’M OUT!

Islandia patch.